9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

A comfortable place for anyone and everyone to talk about running

User avatar
CAW
Lynn Williams
Posts: 14108
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:29 pm
Location: Just follow the yellow brick road

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby CAW » Thu Feb 21, 2013 11:07 pm

ultraslacker wrote:
Jo-Jo wrote:
Jo-Jo wrote:
ultraslacker wrote:Seems to me that running marathons and running a marathon in Antarctica are entirely different questions. :/


I agree.



I forgot it's summer in Antactica.
The forecasted temperature of 35 degrees Farenheit changes my opinion about the location.
It won't be that cold!


Even in the summer, it's subject to some pretty serious and dangerous storms. At VIMFF last week there was a presentation by an ultrarunner who nearly died while running in Antarctica, because a nasty storm blew in suddenly and she was alone in the middle of nowhere. Sure it was an ultra so she was further away from other people than one would be in a marathon, but the storm danger would still exist. :/ I just can't imagine that the reward is worth the risk... why not wait until he's old enough to make informed decisions for himself?


Who says he isn't already?

I have a 9 year old (10 in April) and we give her all the information we can about something so she can make her own decisions about many many things. As a result she's started and stopped many different "hobbies" and activities, but she's making the decisions and weighing the consequences.

There's nothing saying, in any of the articles, or websites that he is not informed or that the decisions are made by anyone but him.

My 9 year old has come up with some pretty cool ideas that we thought might set her up for failure or disappointment, and we gave her lots of information, yet she still chose to follow through on her ideas. Sometimes she succeeds, sometimes she's utterly heartbroken.

I have a hard time believing that a set of parents that seem pro-active enough to consult numerous medical health practitioners would not also be encouraging free thought and informed decision making from their child.
~Kara~

"To be beautiful means to be yourself. You don’t need to be accepted by others. You need to accept yourself."
— Thich Nhat Hanh

User avatar
ultraslacker
Site Admin
Posts: 46890
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2005 5:33 pm
Location: paradise
Contact:

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby ultraslacker » Thu Feb 21, 2013 11:27 pm

I wasn't talking about free thinking. I was talking about risk evaluation.
"You're an ultrarunner, normal rules don't apply to you." (Doonst)


First say to yourself what you would be; and then do what you have to do. ~Epictetus

User avatar
CAW
Lynn Williams
Posts: 14108
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:29 pm
Location: Just follow the yellow brick road

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby CAW » Thu Feb 21, 2013 11:31 pm

ultraslacker wrote:I wasn't talking about free thinking. I was talking about risk evaluation.


Risk evaluation is part of free thinking. You insinuated that he's uninformed and not able to make decisions on his own about this. As a parent living with a 9 year old (who is as headstrong/stubborn as her parents)...I have a hard time thinking that he isn't informed or able to weigh the consequences.
~Kara~

"To be beautiful means to be yourself. You don’t need to be accepted by others. You need to accept yourself."
— Thich Nhat Hanh

User avatar
Jwolf
Kevin Sullivan
Posts: 37476
Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2005 10:02 pm
Location: Vancouver

9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby Jwolf » Thu Feb 21, 2013 11:42 pm

Young kids just don't have that kind of maturity for completely balanced judgement. That's why as parents we help and guide them.
Support me in my fundraising for the Boston Marathon, Boston Public Library team:
https://www.crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign ... iferwolf11

User avatar
dgrant
Lynn Williams
Posts: 13854
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 12:01 am
Location: Down by the river

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby dgrant » Fri Feb 22, 2013 12:17 am

I do think it's fair game to judge... As it's being done as a well-intentioned publicity stunt, they are asking for your tacit approval (in the form of donations).

The two big red flags for me would be:
- Choosing a race far in advance that requires big logistical and financial commitments. If the runner has an ailment or is underprepared, is there dangerous pressure to go ahead with the race because of the investment? I worry about this for adult runners registering for October races in January... it seems dicier for a young child.
- On the website there are several reassuring passages about the kid being under the watchful eye of his dad, who is characterized as a veteran marathoner. But they have an unusual last name and it takes less than a minute on marathonguide to see that Dad is ...mmm... maybe a very novice or casual runner (all results in the 5 and a half hour range for the M40-49 category). I don't know if that's indicative of someone with the kind of running background that makes you say "clearly this kid's in expert hands".

Hopefully it all works out for them, but doesn't seem like something to be encouraged IMHO.

User avatar
AjaxRunner
Tom Longboat
Posts: 434
Joined: Fri May 06, 2011 10:24 am
Location: Etobicoke (Don't let the name fool you)

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby AjaxRunner » Fri Feb 22, 2013 9:48 am

ultraslacker wrote:I wasn't talking about free thinking. I was talking about risk evaluation.


So what is the documented risk of doing this?

Is it any worse than hockey or football, or maybe even basketball, where risks are known and documented and injuries can be pretty severe. These are also sports where kids often play because they feel they have to, due to parental pressure. Hockey and football also require a significant cash outlay before one can even start the sport.

Or are we just seeing this reaction because it isn't common and most adults wouldn't be able to do what this 9 year old is planning to do? Kind of makes you feel like, if I can't do it, it can't possibly be good for a child?

User avatar
HCcD
Donovan Bailey
Posts: 60022
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 8:05 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby HCcD » Fri Feb 22, 2013 9:57 am

As posted earlier, the kid just completed his first marathon distance back in December in around 6 hours or so, proving that he can go the distance, so I would assume the inherent risk factor revolves around running it in the Antartic, where the conditions and weather could be unpredictable ??? :what: :what:

As well, a walk/jog 6 hour marathon, as mentioned earlier, and on his website suggests that this is not a real physically demanding than racing it, etc .... His father even noted that the kid actually runs faster than he does in training ... :shock: :? so, yeah, the definition of "veteran" marathoner could mean a lot of things ... :roll: :?

Having said that, if I recall, Tori has already asked me if I would be willing to train and run with Owen for his first 100K, back in January, if I recall ... :shock: :? :lol: :wink: :shifty:
Race Results: http://itsmyrun.com/index.php?display=p ... unner=HCiD

User avatar
Jwolf
Kevin Sullivan
Posts: 37476
Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2005 10:02 pm
Location: Vancouver

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby Jwolf » Wed Feb 27, 2013 5:11 pm

I've been following the story with interest since you posted this, Lisa. There was a good piece on "CBS This Morning":
http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50141705n
They post updates on the blog and also their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/nikrtw

The marathon was supposed to be Monday but was postponed because of weather. But they did it yesterday. :) Now Nikolas and his dad are back in Chile.
Support me in my fundraising for the Boston Marathon, Boston Public Library team:
https://www.crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign ... iferwolf11

User avatar
drghfx
Abby Hoffman
Posts: 9781
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2005 6:49 pm
Location: Halifax, NS

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby drghfx » Wed Feb 27, 2013 8:55 pm

Jwolf wrote:Young kids just don't have that kind of maturity for completely balanced judgement. That's why as parents we help and guide them.


So some kid should ask his 100 pound overweight, smoking, drinking parents about risk evaluation? Sorry, but many adults don't have the kind of maturity for completely balanced judgement.
"A true conservationist is a man who knows that the world is not given by his fathers but borrowed from his children." - John James Audubon

"The ultimate test of a moral society is the kind of world that it leaves to its children." - Dietrich Bonhoeffer

"I was watching the London Marathon and saw one runner dressed as a chicken and another runner dressed as an egg. I thought: 'This could be interesting'." - Paddy Lennox

"There is no snooze button on a cat who wants breakfast!" - author unknown

Dstew
Bill Crothers
Posts: 3403
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 7:41 pm

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby Dstew » Thu Feb 28, 2013 2:13 am

AjaxRunner wrote:
ultraslacker wrote:I wasn't talking about free thinking. I was talking about risk evaluation.


So what is the documented risk of doing this?

Is it any worse than hockey or football, or maybe even basketball, where risks are known and documented and injuries can be pretty severe. These are also sports where kids often play because they feel they have to, due to parental pressure. Hockey and football also require a significant cash outlay before one can even start the sport.

Or are we just seeing this reaction because it isn't common and most adults wouldn't be able to do what this 9 year old is planning to do? Kind of makes you feel like, if I can't do it, it can't possibly be good for a child?


Decent summary:

http://www.kidsrunning.com/news/krnewsm ... ement.html

International Marathon Medical Directors Association in the early 1980s, and reasserted in 2001 not to let children run marathons.


AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS:

Although running is a natural activity that can maintain and improve aerobic fitness, racing and particularly training for long distances have their risks. Distance running may induce musculoskeletal, endocrine, hematologic, thermoregulatory, and psychosocial damage. Most reports on such potential damage have not been evaluated with proper epidemiologic scrutiny. It is unknown whether the risk is greater for children than for adults. Nevertheless, the American Academy of Pediatrics wishes to alert the physician to the presence of such risks. Even without established guidelines and extensive documentation, physicians can give children, parents, and coaches advice that fosters healthy physical and psychosocial growth.

The most common musculoskeletal problems in the young runner are overuse injuries (ie, those that result from a mechanical stress repeated during a long period). These include epiphyseal plate injuries, stress fractures, patellofemoral syndrome, and chronic tendonitis.1-4 The incidence of such injuries seems to be related to the total distance covered in training and competition.4 Such overuse injuries may lead to a chronic disability (eg, chronic arthritis and growth deformity). Therefore, early medical intervention is important.



The general consensus is that running is good so why have the 50% or higher risk that anyone would have in getting injured due to volume training that anyone faces when training for a marathon when there is no knowledge as to what the long term consequences could be. As with adults, there are kids who have the genetic predisposition to be able to put in the miles necessary and have no ill effect but is it a risk parents should be taking with their kid?

The health and fitness benefits of running are almost endless but that is moderate to high intensity with a limit of around 30 - 60 minutes a day and 2 - 4 days a week. There are exceptions of course but training and running marathons is not the way to optimize one's health and fitness and should that not be the focus of a nine year old. Instead of run walk a marathon in six hours, it seems much more sensible to get the kid to master the mile or 800 meters and as he grows, add a new distance. The counter is that it is healthier than sitting on a couch but it is not healthier than properly training for a 5 or 10 K race. A marathon for the vast majority is a lifestyle choice and no matter how bright or independent a 9 year old is, should they be allowed to make such decisions on their own?

User avatar
Robinandamelia
Jerome Drayton
Posts: 5044
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 7:31 am
Location: Bradford, Ontario
Contact:

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby Robinandamelia » Thu Feb 28, 2013 8:40 am

Jwolf wrote:Young kids just don't have that kind of maturity for completely balanced judgement. That's why as parents we help and guide them.


I agree with this.

User avatar
HCcD
Donovan Bailey
Posts: 60022
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 8:05 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby HCcD » Thu Feb 28, 2013 8:49 am

Jwolf wrote:The marathon was supposed to be Monday but was postponed because of weather. But they did it yesterday. :) Now Nikolas and his dad are back in Chile.


At over $6,000 when you add up all the registration, admin and travel costs to this marathon ... and, a very small field, I guess they can afford to postone the event a day or two, eh !!! ... :lol: :wink: :shifty:
Race Results: http://itsmyrun.com/index.php?display=p ... unner=HCiD

User avatar
AjaxRunner
Tom Longboat
Posts: 434
Joined: Fri May 06, 2011 10:24 am
Location: Etobicoke (Don't let the name fool you)

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby AjaxRunner » Mon Mar 04, 2013 11:16 am

Dstew wrote:
AjaxRunner wrote:
ultraslacker wrote:I wasn't talking about free thinking. I was talking about risk evaluation.


So what is the documented risk of doing this?

Is it any worse than hockey or football, or maybe even basketball, where risks are known and documented and injuries can be pretty severe. These are also sports where kids often play because they feel they have to, due to parental pressure. Hockey and football also require a significant cash outlay before one can even start the sport.

Or are we just seeing this reaction because it isn't common and most adults wouldn't be able to do what this 9 year old is planning to do? Kind of makes you feel like, if I can't do it, it can't possibly be good for a child?


Decent summary:

http://www.kidsrunning.com/news/krnewsm ... ement.html

International Marathon Medical Directors Association in the early 1980s, and reasserted in 2001 not to let children run marathons.


AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS:

Although running is a natural activity that can maintain and improve aerobic fitness, racing and particularly training for long distances have their risks. Distance running may induce musculoskeletal, endocrine, hematologic, thermoregulatory, and psychosocial damage. Most reports on such potential damage have not been evaluated with proper epidemiologic scrutiny. It is unknown whether the risk is greater for children than for adults. Nevertheless, the American Academy of Pediatrics wishes to alert the physician to the presence of such risks. Even without established guidelines and extensive documentation, physicians can give children, parents, and coaches advice that fosters healthy physical and psychosocial growth.

The most common musculoskeletal problems in the young runner are overuse injuries (ie, those that result from a mechanical stress repeated during a long period). These include epiphyseal plate injuries, stress fractures, patellofemoral syndrome, and chronic tendonitis.1-4 The incidence of such injuries seems to be related to the total distance covered in training and competition.4 Such overuse injuries may lead to a chronic disability (eg, chronic arthritis and growth deformity). Therefore, early medical intervention is important.



The general consensus is that running is good so why have the 50% or higher risk that anyone would have in getting injured due to volume training that anyone faces when training for a marathon when there is no knowledge as to what the long term consequences could be. As with adults, there are kids who have the genetic predisposition to be able to put in the miles necessary and have no ill effect but is it a risk parents should be taking with their kid?

The health and fitness benefits of running are almost endless but that is moderate to high intensity with a limit of around 30 - 60 minutes a day and 2 - 4 days a week. There are exceptions of course but training and running marathons is not the way to optimize one's health and fitness and should that not be the focus of a nine year old. Instead of run walk a marathon in six hours, it seems much more sensible to get the kid to master the mile or 800 meters and as he grows, add a new distance. The counter is that it is healthier than sitting on a couch but it is not healthier than properly training for a 5 or 10 K race. A marathon for the vast majority is a lifestyle choice and no matter how bright or independent a 9 year old is, should they be allowed to make such decisions on their own?





From your linked report:

Distance running may induce musculoskeletal, endocrine, hematologic, thermoregulatory, and psychosocial damage. Most reports on such potential damage have not been evaluated with proper epidemiologic scrutiny. It is unknown whether the risk is greater for children than for adults.

That's a lot of "may" and "not reviewed" and "unknown". The statement reeks of CYA, Cover your A... Basically they are saying, we don't know if it is bad, therefor we will say don't let your kids do it. Part of parenting is evaluating risks for your children and deciding whether or not to allow things to take place, or to alter the circumstances under which things take place.

User avatar
Jwolf
Kevin Sullivan
Posts: 37476
Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2005 10:02 pm
Location: Vancouver

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby Jwolf » Mon Mar 04, 2013 11:20 am

AjaxRunner wrote:From your linked report:

"Distance running may induce musculoskeletal, endocrine, hematologic, thermoregulatory, and psychosocial damage. Most reports on such potential damage have not been evaluated with proper epidemiologic scrutiny. It is unknown whether the risk is greater for children than for adults."

That's a lot of "may" and "not reviewed" and "unknown". The statement reeks of CYA, Cover your A... Basically they are saying, we don't know if it is bad, therefor we will say don't let your kids do it. Part of parenting is evaluating risks for your children and deciding whether or not to allow things to take place, or to alter the circumstances under which things take place.



Exactly.

If someone were to do the same analysis and risk assessment of sports like hockey or football or skiing, they'd likely come to the same conclusions. Well, worse where the long-term documented effects of impact and injuries are now becoming apparent.
Support me in my fundraising for the Boston Marathon, Boston Public Library team:
https://www.crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign ... iferwolf11

Jpod
Percy Williams
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 10:13 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby Jpod » Mon Mar 04, 2013 4:21 pm

Wow that is one hardcore kid!
At 9 years old my "long distance running" races were 1km long, and I thought that was a big deal! :P

While I do think it's great for a kid to have such dedication, maybe Antarctica is overdoing it a little? Then again, what do I know? I'm not a specialist in anything. Hopefully it goes smoothly, that's all I can say.

Jpod
Percy Williams
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 10:13 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby Jpod » Mon Mar 04, 2013 4:30 pm

Jwolf wrote:If someone were to do the same analysis and risk assessment of sports like hockey or football or skiing, they'd likely come to the same conclusions. Well, worse where the long-term documented effects of impact and injuries are now becoming apparent.


Hockey, for sure! I am dead set against ever letting my kids play that sport because of all the physical danger in it. One look at all the NHL players, and their broken noses, lack of teeth, suspensions due to concussions... Scary stuff. Football is just as bad, I would imagine.

I'm guessing you meant down-hill skiing when you said skiing? I was a x-country ski instructor in my teens and found it was more akin to running - very few injuries ever happened.

User avatar
dgrant
Lynn Williams
Posts: 13854
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 12:01 am
Location: Down by the river

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby dgrant » Mon Mar 04, 2013 5:08 pm

AjaxRunner wrote: Basically they are saying, we don't know if it is bad, therefor we will say don't let your kids do it.


Just my personal opinion, but that seems quite reasonable. If the risks of a nine year old running a 42km are unknown, and there are no incremental benefits vs running 5km, then it seems fair to err on the side of caution. It's not all or nothing, a marathon is not the only running distance.

User avatar
ian
Jerome Drayton
Posts: 5973
Joined: Sat Jul 26, 2008 4:44 pm

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby ian » Mon Mar 04, 2013 7:51 pm

It seems that the lack of any conclusive scientific studies about the effects of long-distance running on kids is being used to justify both sides of the argument. Unfortunately, this is unlikely to change, as there is no way that such a study would make it through the ethics approval process of modern universities, so we're left with a collection of anecdotes and some speculative comparisons involving similar behavior with adults. Fortunately, there really isn't any money to be made here, therefore I have an easier time trusting the motives of the parents of these young runners, even if I may make different choices with my own hypothetical children.

User avatar
Jwolf
Kevin Sullivan
Posts: 37476
Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2005 10:02 pm
Location: Vancouver

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby Jwolf » Mon Mar 04, 2013 8:24 pm

Jpod wrote:While I do think it's great for a kid to have such dedication, maybe Antarctica is overdoing it a little? Then again, what do I know? I'm not a specialist in anything. Hopefully it goes smoothly, that's all I can say.

He's already done it, and planning out where the next one will be. :)

https://www.facebook.com/nikrtw?fref=ts
Support me in my fundraising for the Boston Marathon, Boston Public Library team:
https://www.crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign ... iferwolf11

User avatar
Tori
Jerome Drayton
Posts: 7551
Joined: Tue Oct 31, 2006 5:28 pm
Location: Orleans, Ontario

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby Tori » Mon Mar 04, 2013 9:16 pm

HCcD wrote:Having said that, if I recall, Tori has already asked me if I would be willing to train and run with Owen for his first 100K, back in January, if I recall ... :shock: :? :lol: :wink: :shifty:


:naughty: :naughty: Owen came up with that idea all on his own! No pressure from mom. But remember anything over 1k for him feels like a 100k, he doesn't know the difference. And counting to 100 in kindergarten sounds all hardcore to him. :lol:

Good for the kid for finishing but I don't think multiple marathons at age 9 is something I would be promoting at home. My biggest worry would be growth plate injuries just from personal family experience.

Dstew
Bill Crothers
Posts: 3403
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 7:41 pm

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby Dstew » Tue Mar 05, 2013 4:48 am

dgrant wrote:
AjaxRunner wrote: Basically they are saying, we don't know if it is bad, therefor we will say don't let your kids do it.


Just my personal opinion, but that seems quite reasonable. If the risks of a nine year old running a 42km are unknown, and there are no incremental benefits vs running 5km, then it seems fair to err on the side of caution. It's not all or nothing, a marathon is not the only running distance.


You got the point the authors were trying to make with regards to the risks of running a marathon at any age. It is just as children are still developing, the odds or risk of something going terribly wrong will out weigh the minimal benefit of running a marathon. Although this analysis probably could apply to most adults as well.

There is the U curve: No exercise is bad but too much is almost as bad. There are going to be children as well as adults that 32 K is about the same as 16 K is for most people. But why risk screwing up a child who cannot understand or truly appreciate the long term consequences and risks of running a distance that has no additional benefit.

Or to put it another way, roughly 50 % of people who start training for a marathon are going to get hurt and there is no reason to believe that those overuse injuries will be any less prevalent among children. There are some other kid specific issues with heat exchange but really the point is why risk having a child get hurt doing something that has much less value in terms of health and fitness and less risky than running 5 or 10 K races until they are more fully developed because no one knows what the long term consequences are. It would seem to me that any reasonable and prudent parent would take the less risky path.

Plus, what is the rush to run a marathon. With all of the studies that have come out, a marathon is an indulgence. Yes, there are people who reap tremendous benefits from running marathons but to optimize one's health and fitness, the average person should be limiting your runs to no more than 45 - 60 minutes. What doctors seem to be saying that for the average person, you start to lose the health and fitness benefits of good hard but limited running gives one and there is a significant risk of injury that can severely impact one's health and fitness so for most, it is better to run one or just a few marathons and then stop. The counter to that is the stories of the 60 or 70 year old friend who runs multiple marathons but what we never hear about are the people who get hurt running and abandon the sport.

Life is not about certainty but playing the odds, looking at probabilities and weighing risks and rewards. For a kid, there will not likely but much reward and there are significant and unknown risks that they cannot truly appreciate in running a marathon. Whereas the rewards of running shorter distances are well documented and the risks significantly less although even at shorter distances parents and coaches have to monitor for over use. As with most things involving children, how unreasonable is it to err on the side of caution.

User avatar
AjaxRunner
Tom Longboat
Posts: 434
Joined: Fri May 06, 2011 10:24 am
Location: Etobicoke (Don't let the name fool you)

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby AjaxRunner » Tue Mar 05, 2013 10:40 am

Dstew wrote:
dgrant wrote:
AjaxRunner wrote: Basically they are saying, we don't know if it is bad, therefor we will say don't let your kids do it.


Just my personal opinion, but that seems quite reasonable. If the risks of a nine year old running a 42km are unknown, and there are no incremental benefits vs running 5km, then it seems fair to err on the side of caution. It's not all or nothing, a marathon is not the only running distance.


You got the point the authors were trying to make with regards to the risks of running a marathon at any age. It is just as children are still developing, the odds or risk of something going terribly wrong will out weigh the minimal benefit of running a marathon. Although this analysis probably could apply to most adults as well.

There is the U curve: No exercise is bad but too much is almost as bad. There are going to be children as well as adults that 32 K is about the same as 16 K is for most people. But why risk screwing up a child who cannot understand or truly appreciate the long term consequences and risks of running a distance that has no additional benefit.

Or to put it another way, roughly 50 % of people who start training for a marathon are going to get hurt and there is no reason to believe that those overuse injuries will be any less prevalent among children. There are some other kid specific issues with heat exchange but really the point is why risk having a child get hurt doing something that has much less value in terms of health and fitness and less risky than running 5 or 10 K races until they are more fully developed because no one knows what the long term consequences are. It would seem to me that any reasonable and prudent parent would take the less risky path.

Plus, what is the rush to run a marathon. With all of the studies that have come out, a marathon is an indulgence. Yes, there are people who reap tremendous benefits from running marathons but to optimize one's health and fitness, the average person should be limiting your runs to no more than 45 - 60 minutes. What doctors seem to be saying that for the average person, you start to lose the health and fitness benefits of good hard but limited running gives one and there is a significant risk of injury that can severely impact one's health and fitness so for most, it is better to run one or just a few marathons and then stop. The counter to that is the stories of the 60 or 70 year old friend who runs multiple marathons but what we never hear about are the people who get hurt running and abandon the sport.

Life is not about certainty but playing the odds, looking at probabilities and weighing risks and rewards. For a kid, there will not likely but much reward and there are significant and unknown risks that they cannot truly appreciate in running a marathon. Whereas the rewards of running shorter distances are well documented and the risks significantly less although even at shorter distances parents and coaches have to monitor for over use. As with most things involving children, how unreasonable is it to err on the side of caution.



Yet nobody has been able tell me how this is worse than playing hockey or football.

Or to put it another way, roughly 50 % of people who start training for a marathon are going to get hurt and there is no reason to believe that those overuse injuries will be any less prevalent among children.


To me there is. I believe a child will be much better at listening to his or her body. has less stress influeance from outside sources. And is far less ego driven, causing a reduced risk of "running thourhg injuries".

As far is thinking there is no reward to a kid in doing this, well I think you have that wrong. The life lessons this child is going to learn are quite tremendous. In the mean time his training regiment and the child himself has been cleared by Pediatric Cardiologists and specialists in sports medicin. He is monitored by doctors and was tested prior to and after his first marathon. Which he "ran" at an 8:30 pace.

This is something the child wanted to do to help a charity. In stead of taking the easy way out, by saying no, the parents got together and starting thinking about if this was a possibility, and if so, how they could help and support.

Nice to see a 9 year old with motivation beyond what game they want for the Xbox.

User avatar
dgrant
Lynn Williams
Posts: 13854
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 12:01 am
Location: Down by the river

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby dgrant » Tue Mar 05, 2013 11:04 am

AjaxRunner wrote:Yet nobody has been able tell me how this is worse than playing hockey or football.


In both hockey and football, nine year olds play a shortened, impact-reduced version of the adult game. Seems like a good strategy to take with running as well.

trixiee
Lynn Williams
Posts: 17644
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 6:26 pm

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby trixiee » Tue Mar 05, 2013 11:40 am

Tori wrote:
HCcD wrote:Having said that, if I recall, Tori has already asked me if I would be willing to train and run with Owen for his first 100K, back in January, if I recall ... :shock: :? :lol: :wink: :shifty:


:naughty: :naughty: Owen came up with that idea all on his own! No pressure from mom. But remember anything over 1k for him feels like a 100k, he doesn't know the difference. And counting to 100 in kindergarten sounds all hardcore to him. :lol:

Good for the kid for finishing but I don't think multiple marathons at age 9 is something I would be promoting at home. My biggest worry would be growth plate injuries just from personal family experience.


I'm interested in learning more about your personal family experience - if I'm not being too nosy? What sport was it? What was the extent of theinjury? How was this diagnosed?
http://connect.garmin.com/profile/trixiee14

Why fit in when you were born to stand out?
~ Dr. Suess~
Life is short. Drink the good wine first!

pts
Lynn Williams
Posts: 12208
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 2:29 pm
Location: Kitchener, Ontario

Re: 9 year old to run Antarctic Marathon

Postby pts » Tue Mar 05, 2013 1:23 pm

AjaxRunner wrote:
Nice to see a 9 year old with motivation beyond what game they want for the Xbox.


Let's not generalize. Have you heard about the 9yos described by the people in this thread who are active, smart, and funny? Or the 8 (almost 9) yo who played very patiently with my 4yo son all morning this morning because he knows my son worships him? Or, many, many other 9yos? Yes, good for this 9yo to be motivated (even if I don't agree with allowing him to run the marathons). But, just because he does a big thing, doesn't mean the average 9yo is not a wonderful little person with no motivation or goals. Maybe they are busy just being inquisitive, imaginative, active and lovely kids (which is what I hope my children are doing when they are 9). Just my 2cents on this particular comment.
Lady of the Order of the Velour Track Suit


Return to “General Running Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 20 guests