starting off with a 10km run

Everything about the training process, including programs, experiences, etc.

janibob
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starting off with a 10km run

Postby janibob » Fri Sep 19, 2014 2:48 am

Hello all.
I don't know how to start this as my question will be so general. Well, here we go - I want to run 10km with a time of under 50 minutes which I consider a good result for me (I'm tall and heavy). My current time for 10km is 1 hour and 6 minutes so there's much space to improve.
My previous running experience are minimum. I ran in college, but was really lazy about it. Never put much effort in it. I just did it because I knew I had to and to clear my mind from time to time. Now I'm older and I gained some serious weight so I want to do something healthy for me. I want to achieve a good time and lose weight in the process (if this is even possible).
So, consider me a total beginner. What do you suggest? I start off with short runs and try not to overdo myself? I already bought a HR monitor and a good pair of shoes (Asics Kayano -> I will mostly be running on asphalt so this was a smart investment I guess).

Thanks for helping me out.

BJH
Lynn Williams
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Re: starting off with a 10km run

Postby BJH » Fri Sep 19, 2014 1:06 pm

How many times a week are you running? How far each time? Good shoes are important, so well done there.

To improve your time, you can run more, do speed specific drills and/or lose weight.

The general guideline for increasing your training volume is no more than a 5% increase in distance or time per week. Keeping a log helps. Run easy while you build a base, then add hills, tempo runs and speed work. There are a multitude of training programs available online. You can find some links here.

Weight loss is primarily a function of diet. You can't outrun a bad diet and it's really, really easy to fool yourself into thinking its okay to have a treat. Or two. Or five. For example, depending on the individual, a 10k run might help you burn 600 extra calories. That is equivalent to two muffins at Tim Hortons. Running can help you stay motivated to improve your diet. I track calories to ensure I am eating reasonably. Not every day, but if I notice an uptick on the scale, I track for a bit to remind myself how to eat. My favourite calorie counter these days is MyFitnessPal.
The road to hell is paved. Run trails.

janibob
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Re: starting off with a 10km run

Postby janibob » Fri Sep 19, 2014 2:45 pm

I was thinking of starting of with running 3 times per week - 1 day run followed by 2 days of rest. Or maybe 2 times per week with 3 days of rest?
Thanks for the links, I'll check it out and then reply.

Regarding dieting and losing weight. I am on a good diet and always avoid "bad" foods, such as fast food, junk food (chips etc) and excessive use of sugar, salt and fat. I mainly use olive oil and sometimes even coconut oil.
I've done my homework and researched a little regarding calories in - calories out (the basics of weight loss). So I'm at my BMR rate (BMR calculated with this BMR calculator) at the moment and eating about 2300 calories per day. So If I include running every third day I should be losing weight. My BMR is calculated to be 2271 calories to be exact (I'm 190cm tall and have 108kg, age 33) although I don't believe this is 100% correct number as no static formula can provide accurate result. Anyway, I'm on a pretty much healthy diet with more protein and less carbs at the moment.
But the problem is this - for me to advance and build strenght for running I should be eating more calories right (caloric surplus is required to build muscle), but on the other hand for losing weight caloric deficit is required. So my question is this - can I still lose some weight on the go, even though I build muscle?

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Jwolf
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Re: starting off with a 10km run

Postby Jwolf » Fri Sep 19, 2014 2:54 pm

janibob wrote:But the problem is this - for me to advance and build strenght for running I should be eating more calories right (caloric surplus is required to build muscle), but on the other hand for losing weight caloric deficit is required. So my question is this - can I still lose some weight on the go, even though I build muscle?


You do not need eat more to build muscle for running. Your muscles will develop naturally as you run more, and you are already eating enough protein to allow those muscles to build. Some of the energy you need for the running will come from the fat you are burning, and if you go into calorie deficit you will lose weight. And the bonus is losing weight is actually the simplest way to improve your speed, and it will be much easier on your joints, bones, and connective tissues.
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BJH
Lynn Williams
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Re: starting off with a 10km run

Postby BJH » Fri Sep 19, 2014 8:15 pm

To add to Jwolf's point, distance running is about optimizing efficiency. It's more efficient to move less weight over a given distance. You can eat at a deficit and still build leg strength. There is a point at which dropping weight will result in diminishing returns, but that point is on the lighter side of where most recreational runners are.
The road to hell is paved. Run trails.

Northern Runner
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Re: starting off with a 10km run

Postby Northern Runner » Sat Sep 20, 2014 8:53 am

I'm a new old runner too Janibob. And new to this inspirational website.
I ran the Toronto 1/2 Marathon about ten years ago, then didn't exercise intensely at all, and now I want to get back at it. Like you, I've a few pounds to lose, and lots of training ahead to get back to road speed. I plan to run most days as I think that is more conducive to weight loss... and stoking the metabolic fire.
Glad to see you on this site, sharing the journey!

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Joe Dwarf
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starting off with a 10km run

Postby Joe Dwarf » Sat Sep 20, 2014 2:42 pm

It's pretty easy to run on a moderate calorie deficit. I'm doing it right now, aiming for around 500 cal/day. That equates to about a pound a week lost.

Remember if you are a big guy you are burning more calories running than BJH's 60/km. There's any number of calculators around the net. They usually go by weight, sex and distance run - how fast isn't a factor so long as you are running not walking.

BTW I use myfitnesspal too but their running calorie calc is a little high compared to some. You can add your own estimate if you like.

A 50 min 10k is a perfectly reasonable goal. Good luck!

Dstew
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Re: starting off with a 10km run

Postby Dstew » Sat Sep 20, 2014 2:46 pm

I was 38 years old when I ran my very first 10 K race. 200 + pounds on a 5'11" frame so not a small person by any means. I had been very active in a number of sports but as my participation in organized events declined, my weight went up. Hit the gym and that was great during the winter but summer, not so much so I started jogging 3 times a week. I had one basic out and back route where I could turn around at 2.5 K or a total of 5 K or a little longer to make the run 9.5 K. I only knew the distance because it was on a bike path and my time I would look at the clock in my kitchen when I left and when I came back. I was jogging for a number of years and again, no watch and did not even have the slightest concept of speed work. If it was a particularly stressful day, I would run "hard" and if I was tired, "slow" but those were merely relative terms. A coworker convinced me to run a 10 K in June 2002. I finished that one in just under 50 minutes. I still did not even wear the most basic sports watch and my entire training regime was do 5 or 9.5 K and only slowly started to add "intervals" or tempo runs through tips and hints from Running World. I got real daring and would even add in the odd 15 K run but it was pretty much 3 days of running, 2 days of golf and 2 days of rest. By May 2003 I was down to around 45 minutes and several weeks later, near 42 minutes. Marathon in 2004 and qualified for Boston in 2005.

So if my experience has any relevance to your situation my advice to you is go out and "run" at a pace that seems comfortable to you and a distance that works but do so on a regular basis. You almost cannot run too slow for although your training may not be ideal or optimal, at this stage you probably do not know what your body is capable of doing. Run too fast and you risk an injury and unfortunately, the number one factor in running injuries is a prior injury. If you have any athletic ability and experience, listen to your body. There is no shame at this stage to cut runs short or slow them down. Once you have developed a good foundation and have the experience of running, you will quickly find out what works and does not work. For me, 3 - 4 days of running per week is best for me. Others can do 6 or even 7.

I was injury free, it was fun and I continued to improve through merely getting out there and making sure I did my 3 days a week. Until you have a great foundation I am not convinced that the fancy speed work, etc is necessary or even accelerates one's progress to a point the reward is worth the risk. I can also be the poster boy for fast tracking my training. In 2005 I was doing 40 K runs with the last 5 K at race pace. I took nearly 45 minutes off my marathon time and qualified for Boston and although I have no regrets, it also lead to a series of injuries that a few years ago left me unable to even jog for 5 minutes. I had to take a whole year off from not only racing but even doing any running. So the question you have to ask yourself is do I need to get to a certain time goal now or am I willing to wait and slowly build for six months, a year or more? Having said that, training for a 10 K does not carry the same risks and injuries that are more associated with marathon training but it can happen.


If 3 days a week appeals to you and you want to dive into speed work, I would suggest

http://www2.furman.edu/sites/first/pages/rlrf.aspx

I was and now back to being a golfer who will play twice a week or more. So a program that was formed around running three days a week with crossing training on most of the other days has worked well for me. I am not sure it is really necessary to follow the program to the tee but it does provide some structure and some guidance. But I would also suggest you base your workouts on what you are doing now and not what you want to do. It is called the training forward method and that is run to your current abilities and capabilities to slowly but safely improve and what you run on race day is what you run.


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